Fractures & Subsidence

Fracking invloves injecting water, and and proppant into low-permeability shale rocks in order to form cracks (fractures) that allow the flow of gas. There is concern that this process may involve risks such as the potential for contamination of drinking water aquifers, reactivation of geologic faults, and subsidence (surface movement). ReFINE's research will aim to better understand how fractures form and behave underground and use this information to improve our understanding of any risks associated with the fracking process itself.  

Research Papers

Hydraulic Fractures: How Far Can They Go?

Review paper by Richard J. Davies, Simon Mathias, Jennifer Moss, Steinar Hustoft, and Leo Newport.

Published in Marine and Petroleum Geology, 2012.

 

Comment on Hydraulic Fractures: How Far Can They Go?

Technical comments on the ReFINE research paper "Hydraulic Fractures: How Far Can The Go?" by Alfred Lacazette and Peter Geiser, May 2013

 

Reply to Comment on Hydraulic Fractures: How Far Can They Go?

Response to comments received on the research paper "Hydraulic Fractures: How Far Can The Go?" by Davies et al., 2013

   

 

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